Tanzania

Increasing the number of voluntary medical male circumcisions using triangulated data in the Lakes Region, Tanzania

As coverage of male circumcision increases, it becomes more difficult to identify eligible men for this HIV prevention activity. Using triangulated data to generate maps has helped to identify areas of eligible men and thus increased program performance by 200 percent. Through innovative solutions like this one, Tanzania is on-track to reach its target of 90 percent male circumcision coverage among 10-29 year-olds by 2020.

Enhancing Community Engagement to Reach Men: Working with volunteer community advocates to sustain voluntary medical male circumcision demand in Tanzania

Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is an evidence-based prevention approach that can reduce HIV transmission. However, sustaining demand and lowering costs of this core intervention can be challenging. In Tanzania, engagement and use of a volunteer community-based cadre of lay workers to promote and create demand for VMMC led to an almost five-fold increase in VMMCs performed in health facilities. This increase was sustained over time, with a cumulative 45,182 VMMCs performed eighteen months after the introduction of this model. Moreover, this model also reduced costs by 13%.

Ariel Adherence Clubs: Increasing Retention in Care and Adherence to Life-Saving Antiretroviral Therapy among Children and Adolescents Living with HIV in Tanzania

Ariel Adherence Clubs (AACs) have been implemented across 6 regions in Tanzania, at 105 facilities, since 2007 by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF). AACs were designed to address the social and behavioral barriers to HIV treatment, retention, and adherence faced by children and adolescents. All participants in AACs are required to know their HIV status. As such, trained providers work with caregivers to facilitate disclosure of HIV status to children and adolescents. Psychosocial support groups for HIV-positive children and adolescents aged 5–19 are provided at AACs. Clubs are grounded in the belief that children and adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) will achieve improved health outcomes when clinical services are complemented by high-quality social support and age-appropriate information about HIV infection, treatment, adherence, HIV status disclosure, positive living, and life skills needed for growing and aging into healthy, HIV-positive adults. The purposes of AACs are to improve participant antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence and clinic retention, and provide psychosocial supports to adjust to living with HIV and transitioning into adulthood and adult HIV care.

Bukoba Combination Prevention Evaluation: Effective Approaches to Linking People Living with HIV to Care and Treatment Services in Tanzania

The Bukoba Combination Prevention Evaluation (BCPE) in Tanzania has an innovative, peer-delivered, linkage-case-management (LCM) program for people 18-49 years old who are diagnosed in community and clinical settings.  Through LCM, HIV-positive patients receive a package of peer-delivered linkage services recommended by the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO). The standard set of linkage-to-care recommendations helps ensure all people living with HIV (PLHIV) enroll in care in a timely manner.