AGYW

Operation Triple Zero: Empowering Adolescents and Young People Living with HIV to Take Control of Their Health in Kenya

In Kenya, adolescents and young people living with HIV (AYPLHIV) account for approximately 20% (303,700) of all people living with HIV (Spectrum Estimates, 2015; Kenya HIV Estimates 2015 Report). AYPLHIV (aged 10-24 years) face especially complex challenges dealing with a chronic illness amidst the physical, emotional and psychological developmental changes of transitioning from childhood to adulthood. The Operation Triple Zero (OTZ) initiative engages AYPLHIV as active stakeholders and partners in their health by promoting a responsive service delivery model.

Viremia Clinics in Kenya: Enhanced Monitoring and Management of HIV-Positive Individuals on Antiretroviral Treatment with High Viral Load

The establishment of viremia clinics was an initiative to address the gaps and challenges in the monitoring and management of patients with high VL, and function as a form of differentiated care for unstable clients with high VL.  Held at least one day a month, the viremia clinic utilizes a multidisciplinary team (MDT) model and focuses on enhanced case management and a patient-centered approach. This model is aimed at identifying patient-specific adherence barriers and tailoring interventions to address the patients’ specific needs.  Patients are empowered to make joint decisions with their providers to improve their ART adherence.

Improving Adherence & Retention: Community Adherence and Support Groups in Mozambique

Faced with challenges to patient adherence and retention on antiretroviral therapy (ART), Mozambique implemented a community approach to service delivery. This approach provides patients with easier access to their antiretroviral treatment, in addition to peer support.

Improving Access to HIV Treatment Services through Community Antiretroviral Therapy Distribution Points in Uganda

Because the majority of antiretroviral therapy (ART) services provided in resource-limited settings are done so in standardized yet inefficient ways, long-term ART adherence and retention is difficult. In Uganda, stable clients needed ways to access medications closer to their homes, which would reduce the cost and disruption of remaining adherent to ART.

Improving Patient Antiretroviral Therapy Retention through Community Adherence Groups in Zambia

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is frequently distributed via health facilities and their pharmacies. An increased volume of medically-stable patients at facilities reduces the time clinicians can spend with those who require acute care and also discourages patients from attaining care, due to long wait times.  For medically-stable patients, going to a health facility for monthly refill pickup reduces the likelihood of retention on treatment for a variety of factors, including the transportation costs and financial losses of time missed at work incurred by a trip to the health facility . Importantly, retention on ART is vital to the health of HIV-positive individuals, but also to the well-being of the communities in which they live. Achieving higher rates of retention among HIV-positive patients, then, is crucial.

Bukoba Combination Prevention Evaluation: Effective Approaches to Linking People Living with HIV to Care and Treatment Services in Tanzania

The Bukoba Combination Prevention Evaluation (BCPE) in Tanzania has an innovative, peer-delivered, linkage-case-management (LCM) program for people 18-49 years old who are diagnosed in community and clinical settings.  Through LCM, HIV-positive patients receive a package of peer-delivered linkage services recommended by the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the World Health Organization (WHO). The standard set of linkage-to-care recommendations helps ensure all people living with HIV (PLHIV) enroll in care in a timely manner.

Improving Retention and Viral Load Suppression Rates: Scale-Up of Adherence Clubs for Stable Antiretroviral Patients in Cape Town, South Africa

The Western Cape Government Department of Health adopted the adherence club (AC) model for the Cape Metro district in January 2011. The ART-AC model provides patient-friendly access to ART for clinically stable patients, ART distribution, and care and support to groups of stable patients. ACs can reduce the burden that stable patients place on healthcare facilities, freeing healthcare workers to treat new and unstable patients.

CommLink: Linking People Living with HIV from Community-Based Settings to Care and Treatment Services in Eswatini

Through community-based testing, HIV-infected clients are provided baseline clinical care and a comprehensive package of peer-delivered linkage services recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CommLink mobile clinical and linkage services initiated at the point of HIV diagnosis are designed to help community clients “link” to a local facility for lifetime HIV, care, treatment, and support.

Zvandiri: Peer Counseling to Improve Adolescent Adherence to Treatment and Psychosocial Well-being in Zimbabwe

The Zvandiri program, run by Africaid, began in Zimbabwe in 2004 as a support group for adolescents living with HIV. Community Adolescent Treatment Supporters (CATS),  HIV- positive people aged 18-24 years, work between health facilities and the homes of youth living with HIV (YLHIV) to increase uptake of testing, linkage, and retention in care, adherence, and services related to sexual and reproductive and mental health. Monthly community-based support groups, community outreach teams, and clinic-based Zvandiri Centers provide safe spaces for accessing clinical and social services and linking adolescents to other forms of assistance, while educating individuals on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and life skills. Through these interventions, the Zvandiri program builds mental, emotional, and physical resilience.